Instead of larger, less frequent feedings, offer smaller amounts of breast milk, formula or solid food more often, which can help combat newborn acid reflux. Symptoms of newborn acid reflux usually first show up between weeks 2 and 4. They tend to peak around 4 months and begin to subside around 7 months, when baby begins to sit upright and take more solid foods. Keep in mind that GERD is not nearly as common as GER (gastrointestinal reflux) – a fancy term for spitting up. A majority of babies have some form of GER in the first year.

Lifestyle changes-including feeding and/or position changes-are recommended as first-line therapy for both GER and GERD. If GERD is severe, treatment may include medication or surgery. The surgery to correct reflux is called fundoplication. In some children, the symptoms associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease disappear with or without treatment, usually by the age of two. However, in some children, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is more of a long-term condition and can have a serious effect on both the child and family’s quality of life.

A pediatric gastroenterologist will review your child’s history, examine your child and review his or her diet history and growth charts. Sometimes, it can be helpful for a pediatric gastroenterologist to observe your child being fed or self-feeding.

If reflux continues after your child’s first birthday, or if your child is having symptoms such as lack of weight gain and breathing problems, you might be referred to a doctor who specializes in children’s digestive diseases (pediatric gastroenterologist). Most of the time, reflux in babies is due to a poorly coordinated gastrointestinal tract. Many infants with GERD are otherwise healthy; however, some infants can have problems affecting their nerves, brain, or muscles.

Where his food pipe joins his stomach, there’s a valve that opens to let milk in, and shuts to keep it down. During episodes of reflux, this junction is continuously open allowing a backwards flow of stomach contents into the esophagus. This reverse flow may occur as a consequence of a relatively large volume of fluid relative to a smaller stomach volume, pressure on the abdominal cavity (for example, placed face down [prone] following a feeding), or overfeeding. Infant GER occurs in over 50% of healthy infants with a peak incidence (65%) at approximately 4 months of age.

Too Many Babies Receive Acid Reflux Meds, Says Pediatrician

GORD symptoms include pain and discomfort in the chest or stomach, which might make your baby cranky. Your baby might cry a lot or arch his back. Most children with reflux grow out of it by the time they’re toddlers. This is probably because they’re spending more time in an upright position by this age.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux

There are a number of reasons to avoid introducing cereal and other solids early. There is evidence that the introduction of rice or gluten-containing cereals before 3 months of age increases baby’s risk for type I diabetes.

Thickened feeds can reduce spitting up, but studies have not shown a decrease in reflux index scores (i.e., the “silent reflux” is still present). Per Donna Secker, MS, RD in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, “The effect of thickened feedings may be more cosmetic (decreased regurgitation and increased postprandial sleeping) than beneficial.” Thickened feeds have been associated with increased coughing after feedings, and may also decrease gastric emptying time and increase reflux episodes and aspiration. Note that rice cereal will not effectively thicken breastmilk due to the amylase (an enzyme that digests carbohydrates) naturally present in the breastmilk. GERD may cause babies to either undereat (if they associate feeding with the after-feeding pain, or if it hurts to swallow) or overeat (because sucking keeps the stomach contents down in the stomach and because mother’s milk is a natural antacid). Even though the prone (on the stomach) sleeping position was recommended for babies with reflux in the past, this is no longer recommended.

When this mixing occurs, the band of muscles at the lower end of the esophagus becomes tight, sealing off the food from coming back up. Heartburn Causes, Symptoms and RemediesHeartburn is a symptom of acid reflux that causes chest pain when stomach acid backs up into the esophagus. Heartburn symptoms may mimic chest pain that occurs during a heart attack.

Switch formulas. If your baby is formula-feeding, ask your doctor if you should switch to a different kind.

A surgical procedure provides a cure of the condition. Sometimes your pediatrician may recommend medications that neutralize or decrease the acid in your child’s stomach to treat symptoms associated with GERD. GER in infants is not considered a disease and does not include a “D.” In fact, GER is considered normal.

In severe cases, a GP or gastroenterologist can prescribe medicines that might help with pain and discomfort (Tighe et al, 2014) . Surgery might also be recommended for a small number of babies who have underlying medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy (NICE, 2015; NHS, 2016) . Sometimes babies don’t spit out what comes back up but swallow it instead.

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