While the food is in the fundus, the digestive activities of salivary amylase continue until the food begins mixing with the acidic chyme. Ultimately, mixing waves incorporate this food with the chyme, the acidity of which inactivates salivary amylase and activates lingual lipase. Lingual lipase then begins breaking down triglycerides into free fatty acids, and mono- and diglycerides. Although the walls of the gastric pits are made up primarily of mucus cells, the gastric glands are made up of different types of cells.

Mastication permits easier deglutition (swallowing) and faster chemical breakdown in the digestive tract. During mastication, salivary glands secrete saliva to soften the food into a bolus (semi-solid lump).

Digestion in the Stomach

The intestinal wall is richly supplied with blood vessels that carry the absorbed nutrients to the liver through the portal vein. The intestinal wall releases mucus, which lubricates the intestinal contents, and water, which helps dissolve the digested fragments. Small amounts of enzymes that digest proteins, sugars, and fats are also released. Gastric acid is produced by cells in the lining of the stomach, which are coupled in feedback systems to increase acid production when needed. Gastric acid, gastric juice, or stomach acid, is a digestive fluid formed in the stomach and is composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium chloride (KCl), and sodium chloride (NaCl).

greater quantities of food-such as at holiday dinner-you stretch the stomach more than when you eat less. Hormones control the different digestive enzymes that are secreted in the stomach and the intestine during the process of digestion and absorption. For example, the hormone gastrin stimulates stomach acid secretion in response to food intake. The hormone somatostatin stops the release of stomach acid. In reaction to the smell, sight, or thought of food, like that shown in Figure 15.20, the first hormonal response is that of salivation.

The acid not only provides a suitable environment for pepsin to work but also kills many potentially harmful microbes that enter the stomach in our food. Doctors prescribe acid-suppressants and because those medications “put out the fire” by neutralizing gastric acid and create a more alkaline environment, which relieves the pain.

Some ulcers can bleed very slowly so the person won’t recognize the loss of blood. Over time, the iron in your body will run out, which in turn, will cause anemia.

The first phase of ingestion, called the cephalic phase, is controlled by the neural response to the stimulus provided by food. All aspects, such as sight, sense, and smell, trigger the neural responses resulting in salivation and secretion of gastric juices.

The symptoms can be managed by following a gluten free diet. Doctors can diagnose this condition by taking a full medical history or with a blood test. The liver is an organ in vertebrates, including human. It plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body including glycogen storage, plasma protein synthesis, and drug detoxification.

The parietal cells also secrete intrinsic factor, which is necessary in order for vitamin B12 to be absorbed in the small intestine. The highly acidic environment in the stomach lumen causes proteins from food to lose their characteristic folded structure (or denature).

The Large Intestine/Bowel, or Colon

Remember that digestion is a north to south process. Both the mechanical and chemical breakdown of food begins in the mouth.

Digestive System

It connects the pharynx, which is the body cavity that is common to both the digestive and respiratory systems behind the mouth, with the stomach, where the second stage of digestion is initiated (the first stage is in the mouth with teeth and tongue masticating food and mixing it with saliva). Also known as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the digestive system begins at the mouth, includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (also known as the colon) and rectum, and ends at the anus. The entire system – from mouth to anus – is about 30 feet (9 meters) long, according to the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). As soon as food enters your stomach, your stomach lining releases enzymes that start breaking down proteins in the food. Your stomach lining also secretes hydrochloric acid, which creates the ideal conditions for the protein-digesting enzymes to work.

The pancreatic juice contains enzymes and bicarbonate to neutralise the stomach acid. The pancreatic enzymes are lipase (breaks down fats), protease (breaks down protein) and amylase (breaks down carbohydrates).

The final stage of the digestive system is the colon (large intestine) which absorbs water and salts before the remains are passed out of the rectum as faeces. The colon can also help to absorb remaining carbohydrate and some fats. The small intestine is lined with finger-like projections, called villi, which provide a very large surface area facilitating the absorption of nutrients, including carbohydrates, proteins and fats, into the bloodstream.

The stomach is a thick walled organ that lies between the esophagus and the first part of the small intestine (the duodenum). It is on the left side of the abdominal cavity, the fundus of the stomach lying against the diaphragm.

At mealtime, it is squeezed out of the gallbladder into the bile ducts to reach the intestine and mix with the fat in our food. After the stomach empties the food and juice mixture into the small intestine, the juices of two other digestive organs mix with the food to continue the process of digestion. Digestion involves the mixing of food, its movement through the digestive tract, and the chemical breakdown of the large molecules of food into smaller molecules.

does stomach acid enters the small intestine

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